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  • The Scriptorium

    12/8/2014

    Health law impacts primary care doctor shortage

    Filed under: — Jennifer Rast @ 3:10 am

    Republicans said this would happen. Doctors said this would happen. Americans in general were smart enough to see that it would happen. You don’t flood the healthcare system with millions of newly insured, and expect everything to go along the way it did before.

    There is a shortage of doctors for two reasons. One, the increased number of patients, and two, the number of doctors retiring, or cutting back their patient load because of Obamacare. Two of my doctors retired, rather than deal with it, and I’m just one of many experiencing the same thing. We had the best healthcare system in the world, and now you can’t even find a doctor. We’re becoming Canada. Thanks Obama.

    When Olivia Papa signed up for a new health plan last year, her insurance company assigned her to a primary care doctor. The relatively healthy 61-year-old didn’t try to see the doctor until last month, when she and her husband both needed authorization to see separate specialists.

    She called the doctor’s office several times without luck.

    “They told me that they were not on the plan, they were never on the plan and they’d been trying to get their name off the plan all year,” said Papa, who recently bought a plan from a different insurance company.

    It was no better with the next doctor she was assigned. The Naples, Florida, resident said she left a message to make an appointment, “and they never called back.”

    The Papas were among the 6.7 million people who gained insurance through the Affordable Care Act last year, flooding a primary care system that is struggling to keep up with demand.

    A survey this year by The Physicians Foundation found that 81 percent of doctors describe themselves as either over-extended or at full capacity, and 44 percent said they planned to cut back on the number of patients they see, retire, work part-time or close their practice to new patients.

    Sadly, I’d bet money we’ll see fewer students going into medicine in the future as well.

    Article Link

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